The Canadian Coast Guard celebrates its 50th anniversary – Part II

In a previous blog, we invited you to discover some archival holdings to mark the 50th anniversary of the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), including photographs, as well as government and political records. In this blog, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) encourages you to explore holdings containing CCG caricatures, audiovisual records and publications.

Caricatures

Audiovisual Records

There are many films and interviews on the CCG. It would be nearly impossible to list them all here, but the following are a few examples that may pique your curiosity.

Visit our film, video and sound recording database for more audiovisual records.

Publications

LAC has a vast collection of publications! Here are some books on the CCG that may interest you:

For more publications, visit AMICUS.

If you wish to search the records on-site at LAC, please order them at least five business days before your visit. You may order them online by using our Request for Retrieval of Documents form or by calling 613-996-5115 or  1-866-578-7777 (toll free) and selecting option 8 in the automated menu.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you!

Summary of comments received in French up to September 30th, 2013

  • LAC added the following resources: Usque ad mare: a history of the Canadian Coast Guard and marine services by Thomas E. Appleton. (AMICUS 612170) and The Canadian Coast Guard, 1962-2002 by Charles D. Maginley (AMICUS 28388186).

Queen Victoria’s Journals now available at 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa

At the age of 13, Queen Victoria became an avid journal writer when her mother gave her a diary to document an upcoming trip to Wales. Her last entry was written more than six decades later, on January 13, 1901, only nine days before her death.

This year, in honour of Queen Victoria’s birth (May 24, 1819) and the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, all 141 journal volumes (comprised of 43,765 pages) have been digitized and are now available through a courtesy subscription obtained by Library and Archives  Canada (LAC), through The Royal Household, and with the assistance of ProQuest.

The project’s website says that “ As well as detailing household and family matters, the journals reflect affairs of state, describe meetings with statesmen and other eminent figures, and comment on the literature of the day. They represent a valuable primary source for scholars of nineteenth century British political and social history and for those working on gender and autobiographical writing.”

Not only have the diaries been digitized, they have been (and will continue to be) transcribed to allow for a keyword search. In fact, The Queen, as Head of State for Canada, did not leave us unmentioned. A keyword search for “canad*” (without the quotation marks) currently retrieves more than 150 results up to 1839!

As the project continues and more years are transcribed and become searchable, this resource will become more valuable.

To access the journals, use any of the public workstations located at 395 Wellington Street in Ottawa or our Wi-Fi connection and visit the website Queen Victoria’s Journals [http://www.queenvictoriasjournals.org/]. You may browse the journals by date or search for keywords.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you!

The Canadian Coast Guard celebrates its 50th anniversary- Part I

Black and white photograph of ship cutting a path for icebound vessel.

The CGS Stanley cutting a path for icebound vessels out of Bridgewater, Nova Scotia Source

Did you know that the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG)—which celebrates its 50th anniversary this  year—is heir to a long tradition originating in Canada’s East Coast? It is there that the first Canadian lighthouses and lifeboats were built during the
18th century.

Created in 1962 by the Honourable Leon Balcer, the then Minister of Transport, the CCG’s mission is to ensure safe and accessible waterways for Canadians. Library and Archives Canada (LAC) owns many archival records that document the activities of the CCG since its creation. Today, we invite you to discover some of these holdings, including photographs as well as government and political records.

Browse a few examples of digitized documents in the Archives Search Results page .

PHOTOGRAPHS

GOVERNMENT RECORDS

The Government fonds include textual records, technical drawings and boat plans.

POLITICAL RECORDS

LAC holds the archival fonds of former ministers of Transport, which contain records of the CCG. Here are two examples:

Please remember that not all of our material is available online. To learn more, consult our article How to Consult Material that Is Not Yet Available Online.

To view images, please visit our Flickr set.

Stay tuned for our next blog to discover more Canadian Coast Guard history, including caricatures, audiovisual records and publications.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you!

New Finding Aid Online: Non-Permanent Active Militia

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is pleased to announce that a new finding aid for the Non-Permanent Active Militia, RG 9 II-B-7, is now available online. View the 8,799 lower level descriptions today!

During the First World War, units of the Non-Permanent Active Militia were called upon to perform a variety of military tasks in Canada, notably to guard strategic sites such as armouries, bridges and canals.

The files are arranged alphabetically and can include a variety of forms dealing with enlistment, medical and dental history, hospitalization, discipline, pay, discharge and subsequent correspondence relating to the individual’s eligibility for war service gratuities and other service-related issues. Attestation papers, which are completed at the time of enlistment, are present in a number of the files. They include the recruit’s name and address, next-of-kin, date and place of birth, occupation, previous military experience and distinguishing physical characteristics.

This sub-series also contains small quantities of exceptional files: for members of the permanent force, for members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) prior to embarkation overseas, for members of Royal Flying Corps, and for nursing sisters and other members of the Canadian Army Medical Corps.

Although the outside dates for the records are 1908-1983, the vast majority were created during the period 1914-1919.

Want to learn more about how to use finding aids? Consult our articles “Discover Finding Aids!” and “ Discover Finding Aids – Part Two”.

Be alerted when we have added new finding aids online by subscribing to our RSS feed.

For more information on recent announcements at LAC, visit “News”.

Patrolling the French Shore with Louis Koenig

Newfoundland in the summer, completely inaccessible because of its winged garrison. Library and Archives Canada. (Source)

Did you know that thanks to the collection of Library and Archives Canada (LAC) it is possible to patrol the French Shore of the island of Newfoundland with Lieutenant Louis Koenig and discover this particular area where the French had cod fishing rights for almost 200 years, because of two treaties signed between France and England? Accompany Koenig and the crew of the French frigate La Clorinde during a campaign that brought them to Newfoundland, Cape Breton Island and Saint-Pierre and Miquelon in 1885.

Recognized by the French Navy for his artistic talents, Koenig created the 145 drawings and watercolours, the hand-drawn maps and the logbook, which are found in the Louis Koenig fonds and Louis Koenig Collection. The illustrations, most of which were done on site, show the landscapes and military installations he observed, as well as daily activities on board La Clorinde. The maps give three views of the French Shore and include notes by the artist.The logbook, also written by Koenig, documents the voyage, the places visited and gives his candid impressions of his experiences; devoting particular attention to the mosquitoes, which were apparently delighted to welcome the French sailors! The collection also includes a small sketchbook containing an illustrated, much more personal, account of the voyage, full of humour and whimsy presented by Koenig as a gift to La Clorinde’s commander, Félix-Auguste Le Clerc. Koenig also wrote an article Le « French Shore » (souvenirs de campagne à Terre-Neuve) (The “French Shore”, Memoirs of a Newfoundland Campaign), embellished with his maps and illustrations and published in 1890 in the periodical Tour du monde.

To order published documents that are unavailable online, use our online Request for Retrieval of Documents, or call 613-996-5115, or toll-free 1-866-578-7777, to consult them in person at 395 Wellington Street in Ottawa.

Enjoy the discoveries and view the Flickr set of images from Koenig’s albums!

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you!

Tips and tricks on how to use a microform reader

Numerous documents belonging to Library and Archives Canada’s collection have been copied to microfiche and microfilm (some of which are available via AMICUS, and others via self-service at 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa). First-time researchers may find the equipment required to view this material somewhat confusing.

Therefore, we have prepared a quick list of Do’s and Don’ts to guide you in the proper use and handling of these machines so that your research may be profitable.

DO’s:

  • Prepare ahead of time for your visit and order material in advance, if necessary. To learn how, please consult our previous blog article: “The Top Five Things You Need to Know Before You Visit”.
  • Retrieve your microfilm from the Consultation Reading Room shelves, which are organized by the first letter of your surname, or retrieve self-serve microfilm from the Consultation Reading Room microfilm drawers.
  • Sign in with the Consultation staff in the Microfilm Reading Room for access to a microform reader.
  • Ask the Consultation Staff for assistance if you require help loading the microform onto the readers.
  • Bring your own flash drive or CD/DVD to save digital copies of the material. Printed copies may also be purchased using a copy card, available at the Consultation Office.
  • When making digital scans from microform, please complete a “photo permission” form (used primarily for statistical purposes).
  • Be aware that making copies from microform (either on paper or as digital images) can only be done during service hours.
  • Place the self-serve microfilm reels on the return shelf, located behind the Consultation staff’s desk (in the Microfilm Reading Room) when you are finished with them.
  • Return published microform (that is, the ones you have ordered via AMICUS), to the Published Material return shelf located near the Consultation Office.
  • Consult the Special Collections staff for access to the National Map Collection (NMC) microfiche.

DON’Ts:

  • Don’t place self-serve microfilm reels in your locker. When self-serve microfilm reels are not being used, they must be available for other clients.
  • Don’t disobey the Copyright Act by making digital copies of newspapers less than 100 years old. For more information, please consult the rules posted by each photocopier.
  • Don’t leave microfilm reels at your work station or on top of cabinets.

For more details, be sure to ask our on-site Consultation staff. They are ready to answer any additional questions you may have.

Happy research!

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you!

What can you do at 395 Wellington Street before your appointment?

Our registration staff is often asked the following question:

“I have just registered for a user card at the registration desk on the main level (which is open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday to Friday) but before I begin my research, I need help. I see that the orientation and genealogy service desks open at 10:00 a.m. I have some time until then and I am wondering if there is anything I can do while I wait?”

There are several things you can do while waiting to speak to one of our experts.

PUBLIC ROOMS

You may begin your day in our public rooms, on the second and third levels at 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa. These rooms have computer stations and Wi-Fi, so you can begin browsing our website or others’ sites. You may also wish to visit the cafeteria on the 5th floor where you can watch television while you enjoy a snack.

Opening Hours for the Cafeteria are Monday to Friday, 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

REFERENCE SERVICES

You can also browse our collection of photographs, or look through historical atlases, city directories and phone books in our Reference Services Room, located on the second level. Additionally, in our Reference Collection Room, you will find parliamentary proceedings (Hansard), journals from the House of Commons, session papers up to 1925, annual federal government reports up to 1930 and original, as well as revised, statutes.

Opening Hours for the Reference Services Room are Monday to Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Saturday/Sunday, 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.*

GENEALOGY AND FAMILY HISTORY

If you are coming to Library and Archives Canada to research your family history, head up to the third level and visit our Genealogy and Family History Room. As you enter the room, there are several Info-pages that may be of interest. These provide useful information to help you begin your research.

  • The Info-page called Genealogy Services – Book Collection explains how the books are arranged in the room. You can find books that have
    indexes to church records, cemeteries and other records.
  • The Info-page called Websites for Genealogy Research directs you to our Genealogy and Family History website. You can use the public computers or your
    laptop to search our databases in Ancestry Search or other websites.

Beside each of the computers in the Genealogy and Family History Room, you will find a sign that explains how you can log in to http://www.ancestryinstitution.com/, the free library edition of the popular http://www.ancestry.ca/ website.

If you are a beginner, you will find a display with pedigree charts that you can use to start recording the names of your ancestors.

Opening Hours for the Genealogy and Family History Room are Monday to Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., Saturday/Sunday, 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.*

(*) Consult our website for more details about opening and service hours.

Visit LAC’s website to find more information.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you!

Celebrating the International Day of Peace – Part III: The Voice of Women fonds

In earlier posts to celebrate International Day of Peace, we discussed Julia Grace Wales and Thérèse Casgrain, two Canadian women who played key roles in the international peace movement. Today, we will conclude by discussing the Voice of Women fonds held at Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

Women in North America have long been active in trying to put an end to conflicts around the world. In the early 1960s, when the threat of nuclear war loomed over many nations, our own Canadian Voice of Women for Peace (VOW) was formed. Since then, the organization has been promoting peace and disarmament, particularly in the context of nuclear war.

VOW has organized unique activities to draw attention to its cause. In 1963, it collected and tested thousands of baby teeth from children across North America to demonstrate the fallout from the atmospheric testing of Strontium 90, a harmful radioactive isotope. During the Vietnam War, the Ontario VOW organized the Knitting Project for Vietnamese Children. Over a ten-year period, the group sent thousands of hand-knitted garments and other aid to the child victims of the war and their families.

Over time, VOW has expanded its focus to include human rights and civil liberties, preservation of the environment, as well as economic and political issues.

LAC’s Voice of Women fonds includes correspondence, reports and subject files about many campaigns for peace. Digitized photos are also presented in LAC’s Women and Peace Flickr set.

Please remember that not all of our material is available online. For more information, consult the article How to Consult Material that Is Not Yet Available Online.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you!