The Canadian Coast Guard celebrates its 50th anniversary- Part I

Black and white photograph of ship cutting a path for icebound vessel.

The CGS Stanley cutting a path for icebound vessels out of Bridgewater, Nova Scotia Source

Did you know that the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG)—which celebrates its 50th anniversary this  year—is heir to a long tradition originating in Canada’s East Coast? It is there that the first Canadian lighthouses and lifeboats were built during the
18th century.

Created in 1962 by the Honourable Leon Balcer, the then Minister of Transport, the CCG’s mission is to ensure safe and accessible waterways for Canadians. Library and Archives Canada (LAC) owns many archival records that document the activities of the CCG since its creation. Today, we invite you to discover some of these holdings, including photographs as well as government and political records.

Browse a few examples of digitized documents in the Archives Search Results page .

PHOTOGRAPHS

GOVERNMENT RECORDS

The Government fonds include textual records, technical drawings and boat plans.

POLITICAL RECORDS

LAC holds the archival fonds of former ministers of Transport, which contain records of the CCG. Here are two examples:

Please remember that not all of our material is available online. To learn more, consult our article How to Consult Material that Is Not Yet Available Online.

To view images, please visit our Flickr set.

Stay tuned for our next blog to discover more Canadian Coast Guard history, including caricatures, audiovisual records and publications.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you!

Celebrating the International Day of Peace – Part II: Thérèse Casgrain

Woman in a dress, standing in front of a stair case.

Thérèse Casgrain Source

Recently, to mark the International Day of Peace last September 21, we introduced you to Julia Grace Wales, champion for peace. Today, we present Thérèse Casgrain.

In the 1950s, Thérèse Casgrain became the first woman to be elected to the leadership of a political party in Canada. She was a fierce activist for women’s rights her entire life, and for two decades campaigned to obtain for Quebec women the right to vote in the provincial elections. Throughout her career, she also worked to correct many social injustices, to say nothing of the significant role she played in the promotion of peace. To that end, in 1961, she founded the Quebec chapter of the Voice of Women (Voix des femmes), an organization devoted to world peace—of which she became president the following year.

Thérèse Casgrain fonds

More can be learned about Thérèse Casgrain by consulting the speeches, memorabilia and digitized newspaper clippings (in French only) of the Thérèse Casgrain fonds, in which she talks about what motivated her: [TRANSLATION] “Long convinced that women can be a dynamic force in building peace, I resolved to establish, in February 1961, the Quebec branch of the Voice of Women. […] women of Ontario appealed to all women in our country to raise their voices against the tensions of a cold war and the imminent threat of a nuclear conflict.”

The fonds also comprises photographs, including many that are digitized. Not all the material in this fonds is digitized, but the titles of the various files may be consulted using our online research tool  [PDF].

Remember: Not all our material is digitized and accessible online. For more information, read our post How to Consult Material that Is Not Yet Available Online.

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you!

Discover Canada’s Olympic and Sports History – Part II

Do the London Olympics inspire you to learn more about the history of the evolution of sports in Canada?  If so, a great place to begin your research is at Library and Archives Canada. We hold the records of the national bodies for the following sports:

You will also find more information in the Fitness and Amateur Sport Branch records of the former Department of National Health and Welfare (now Health Canada); this is the main source for learning about the federal government’s involvement in the area of sports. It includes over 40,000 photographs documenting the performance of Canadian athletes at national and international competitions (including the Olympics) during the 1960s and 1970s.

For more information on sports, please visit our other websites:

Please remember that not all of our material is available online; however, it is possible to order archival material through our online Request for Retrieval of Documents Form, or by telephone at 613-996-5115 or 1-866-578-7777 (toll-free).

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you!

Discover Canada’s Olympic and Sports History – Part I

With the London Olympics well underway, it is fitting to remember the past Canadian accomplishments at the Games and to get acquainted with Canada’s relationship with sports throughout history.

For those interested in a visual history of Canada’s participation at the Olympic Games, Library and Archives Canada’s (LAC) Canadian Olympians database and web pages consist of more than 10,000 images of athletes from the 1904 St. Louis Olympics in the United States to the 2004 Olympics in Athens, Greece.

Some of the early important events in Canada’s Olympic history documented at LAC.

*For more information on George Hodgson and other athletes, visit Sporting Lives: Images of Canadian Athletes (archived site).

Please remember that not all of our material is available online; however, it is possible to order archival material through our online Request for Retrieval of Documents Form, or by telephone at 613-996-5115 or 1-866-578-7777 (toll-free).

For more photographs from past Olympics, visit our Images of summer sports and leisure activities Flickr set.

Enjoy the London Games!

Questions or comments? We would love to hear from you!