Did your ancestors come from Iceland?

Do you want to know who your first Icelandic ancestor was and when he or she left Iceland and arrived in Canada? Are you curious about your Icelandic origins?

If so, our website is a great place to begin your research. Here you will find a page dedicated to genealogical research on the Icelanders. This page provides you with historical information, archival documents and published material from the Library and Archives Canada collection, as well as links to other websites and institutions.

If your ancestor came to Canada between 1865 and 1935, you might find his or her name on the passenger lists.

Did your ancestors come from Sweden?

Do you want to know who your first Swedish ancestor was and when he or she left Sweden and arrived in Canada? Are you curious about your Swedish origins?

If so, our website is a great place to begin your research. Here you will find a page dedicated to genealogical research on the Swedes. This page provides you with historical information, archival documents and published material from the Library and Archives Canada collection, as well as links to other websites and institutions.

If your ancestor came to Canada between 1865 and 1935, you might find his or her name on the passenger lists.

Did your ancestors come from Denmark?

Do you want to know who your first Danish ancestor was and when he or she left Denmark and arrived in Canada? Are you curious about your Danish origins?

If so, our website is a great place to begin your research. Here you will find a page dedicated to genealogical research on the Danes. This page provides you with historical information, archival documents and published material from the Library and Archives Canada collection, as well as links to other websites and institutions.

If your ancestor came to Canada between 1865 and 1935, you might find his or her name on the passenger lists.

Release of an updated version of the Immigrants from China database

May is Asian Heritage Month in Canada, during which we acknowledge the long and rich history of Asian Canadians and their contributions to Canada. Asian Heritage Month also provides an opportunity for Canadians to reflect on and celebrate the contributions of Canadians of Asian heritage to the growth and prosperity of Canada.

To celebrate Asian culture, Library and Archives Canada is pleased to announce the addition of more than 35,000 references to its Immigrants from China database. It now includes references to the C.I.9 certificates issued to people of Chinese origin born outside Canada and wanting to leave Canada for a limited time without losing their Canadian status. The actual records include a photograph and provide information such as the individual’s name, age and place of birth, as well as the port and date of departure, and the ship’s name.

Did your ancestors come from Norway?

Do you want to know who your first Norwegian ancestor was and when he or she left Norway and arrived in Canada? Are you curious about your Norwegian origins?

If so, our website is a great place to begin your research. Here you will find a page dedicated to genealogical research on the Norwegians. This page provides you with historical information, archival documents and published material from the Library and Archives Canada collection, as well as links to other websites and institutions.

If your ancestor came to Canada between 1865 and 1935, you might find his or her name on the passenger lists.

Library and Archives Canada releases latest podcast episode, “Digging Into the Past: Family History in Canada”

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is releasing its latest podcast episode, “Digging Into the Past: Family History in Canada”.

In this episode, genealogy consultants Sara Chatfield and Richard Lelièvre from Library and Archives Canada join us to discuss genealogy research. We explore what genealogy is, what is involved, how to start, suggest resources to use and how Library and Archives Canada can help you with your genealogy research.

Subscribe to our podcast episodes using RSS or iTunes, or just tune in at Podcast–Discover Library and Archives Canada: Your History, Your Documentary Heritage.

For more information, please contact us at podcasts@bac-lac.gc.ca.

New Books in the Genealogy Services Collection at 395 Wellington – March 2015

Here is a list of our recently acquired genealogy publications. You can consult them in the Genealogy and Family History Room located on the 3rd floor at 395  Wellington Street. The link to the AMICUS record gives the call number you need to find the book on the shelves.

If you’re just starting out in genealogy, you should check out our Genealogy and Family History pages.

Happy exploring!

Family Histories

Le grand rassemblement…: familles Zéphirina Dupuis, Aquila Dupuis, André-Joseph Dupuis : généalogie et biographie by Francine Dupuis Loranger (AMICUS 43219206)

Mes ancêtres Laroche et Desrochers by Lyne Laroche, Nicole Levesque (AMICUS 43036457)

The Melanson story: Acadian family, Acadian times by Margaret C. Melanson (AMICUS 43102537)

Une famille, un village, un pays : les Gagnon, les Bergeronnes, le Québec by Rodolphe Gagnon (AMICUS 42915824)

Ethnic and Local Histories

Cartes mortuaires. Les Éboulements et Saint-Joseph-de-la-Rive by Alain Anctil-Tremblay, Jean-Philippe Tremblay (AMICUS 41850791)

Cimetières La Malbaie by Alain Anctil-Tremblay, Jean-Philippe Tremblay (AMICUS 41850786)

Cimetières Les Éboulements, 1733-2010 et Saint-Joseph-de-la Rive, 1932-2010 by Alain Anctil-Tremblay, Jean-Philippe Tremblay (AMICUS 41850986)

Familles Caron d’Amérique : répertoire généalogique by the Association les familles Caron d’Amérique (AMICUS 43168696)

Généalogie des familles acadiennes de l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard (volume 5) by Jean Bernard (AMICUS 38333031)

Gravestones of Glengarry (volumes 10 to 14) by Alex W. Fraser (AMICUS 48101)

Did your ancestors come from Japan?

Do you want to know who your first Japanese ancestor was and when he or she left Japan and arrived in Canada? Are you curious about your Japanese origins?

If so, our website is a great place to begin your research. Here you will find a page dedicated to genealogical research on the Japanese. This page provides you with historical information, archival documents and published material from the Library and Archives Canada collection, as well as links to other websites and institutions. During the Second World War, more than 20,000 Japanese people were placed in internment camps and relocation centres in the interior of British Columbia, in Alberta and in Ontario.

If your ancestor came to Canada between 1865 and 1935, you might find his or her name on the passenger lists.

Do you have ancestors of Black heritage?

Do you want to know when or how your ancestor your first arrived in in Canada? If so, our website is a great place to begin your research. Here you will find a page dedicated to genealogical research on Black heritage. This page provides you with historical information, archival documents and published material from the Library and Archives Canada collection, as well as links to other websites and institutions.

After the American Revolution, the British gave passage to over 3,000 slaves and free Blacks who had remained loyal to the Crown. These Black loyalists joined the many other United Empire Loyalists in settlements across the Maritime Provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island. Other Black slaves joined their Loyalist slave owners when they migrated to Canada. Names of those Black Loyalists can be found in the Port Roseway Associates, Muster Book of Free Blacks, Settlement of Birchtown, 1784 and Ward Chipman, Muster Master’s Office (1777–1785) databases.

Did your ancestors come from England?

Do you want to know who your first British ancestor was and when he or she left England and arrived in Canada? Are you curious about your British origins?

If so, our website is a great place to begin your research. Here you will find a page dedicated to genealogical research on the British. This page provides you with historical information, archival documents and published material from the Library and Archives Canada collection, as well as links to other websites and institutions. This page also contains a link to our resources about Home Children; it is estimated that more than four million Canadians are descendants of British Home Children.

If your ancestor came to Canada between 1865 and 1935, you might find his or her name on the passenger lists.